Surgeries Performed

1.ESOPHAGEAL SURGERY

Surgery for corrosive esophageal injury

While accidental ingestion of caustic materials is common in children, intentional ingestion is the leading cause of caustic esophageal injury in adults. The diagnosis should be suspected in all patients brought to the emergency ward for attempted suicide. These exposures cause injuries ranging in severity from first-, second-, or third-degree burn to full-thickness necrosis and frank perforation, often requiring surgical treatment.A good number of these patients respond well to endoscopic dilatation wile some of the them will require surgery in the form of Gastric pull-up or colon pull-up to replace damaged esophagus called as Esophageal Surgery.

The injury may be fatal and warrants immediate treatment. Identifying the nature of the ingested substance is paramount to proper management because the severity and nature of the injury are related to the chemical and physical properties of the caustic agent .

These exposures cause injuries ranging in severity from first-, second-, or third-degree burn to full-thickness necrosis and frank perforation, often requiring surgical treatment.

A good number of these patients respond well to endoscopic dilatation wile some of the them will require surgery in the form of Gastric pull-up or colon pull-up to replace damaged esophagus called as Esophageal Surgery.
 

Esophageal Cancer Surgery

Surgery is commonly used to treat esophageal cancer that has not spread beyond the esophagus and its surrounding lymph nodes. The goal of the operation is to remove the cancer and nearby tissue that may be affected. In an esophagectomy, the surgeon removes part of the esophagus, nearby lymph nodes, and possibly part of the stomach. The remaining part of the esophagus is then connected to the stomach.

Some patients are candidates for minimally invasive surgery, an approach that utilizes smaller incisions to remove the cancer. Benefits of minimally invasive surgery include less pain, less scarring, and a quicker recovery after surgery.

An esophagectomy is major surgery, and should be done by surgeons who have experience performing the procedure. Studies show that patients who have esophagectomies at hospitals that perform the procedure more frequently fare better than those who go to hospitals with less experience.

Dr.R.Kannan has a vast experience in surgery of the Esophageal Cancer.



2.GASTRIC SURGERY

Surgery for gastric ulcer

A large ulcer in the stomach presents with severe upper abdominal pain and vomiting. Most often these ulcers heal by prolonged medication. These ulcers can bleed massively requiring transfusion of blood and sometimes surgery. Non-healing ulcers will require Surgery in the form of partial gastrectomy or removing a part of the stomach.
 

Surgery for duodenal ulcer

An ulcer is a sore or lesion that forms in the lining of the stomach or duodenum where acid and pepsin are present. Ulcers in the stomach are called gastric or stomach ulcers. Those in the duodenum are called duodenal ulcers. In general, ulcers in the stomach and duodenum are referred to as peptic ulcers. Ulcers rarely occur in the esophagus or in the first portion of the duodenum, the duodenal bulb.

Ulcers in the duodenum are more common than gastric ulcers.Duodenal ulcers can cause bleeding or sometimes gastric outlet obstruction causing persistent vomiting.

Majority of these patients will get cured by medication. Patients will require surgery when medications do not help.

Surgery for this ailment will be in the form of gastro-jejunostomy by-pass) and truncal vagotomy to decrease gastric acid.



3.LIVER SURGERY

Liver abscess

Liver abscess is a pus-filled cyst in the liver. The liver is an organ in the digestive system that assists the digestive process and carries out many other essential functions.

These functions include producing bile to help break down food into energy; creating essential substances, such as hormones; cleaning toxins from the blood, including those from medication, alcohol and drugs; and controlling fat storage and cholesterol production and release.

Surgical treatment of liver abscess is necessary in many cases to drain the abscess with a needle or small tube inserted through the abdomen. This surgical procedure is called laparoscopic or percutaneous drainage and aspiration.
 

Liver cyst

Also known as a hepatic cyst, a simple liver cyst is a thin-walled bubble, a fluid-filled cavity in the liver that usually produces no signs or symptoms. Some liver cysts do not contain fluid.

A relatively common condition, liver cysts are normally benign and pose no problems or health risks. They are usually detected by chance during other types of testing, and may be diagnosed through ultrasound or computerized tomography (CAT) scans.

In some cases, however, liver cysts may grow large enough to cause pain or discomfort in the upper right part of the abdomen, liver enlargement, bile duct infection, or obstruction of the bile ducts, causing the cyst itself to become infected. In these cases, it is necessary to drain and/or remove the cyst.

A biopsy can be performed and/or a sample of the cyst's fluid can be removed for analysis. Liver cysts can be surgically removed if they create problems or discomfort. 



4.GALL BLADER SURGERY
 
Gallbladder stones are an extremely common disorder and are usually asymptomatic. Some patients experience biliary colic, an intermittent and often severe pain in the epigastrium or right upper quadrant, and at times between the scapula because of temporary obstruction of the cystic duct with a gallstone.

If the cystic duct obstruction persists, the gallbladder becomes inflamed and the patient develops cholecystitis, an acute inflammation and infection of the gallbladder
 

Signs and Symptoms

The vast majority of patients with gallstones are asymptomatic. Symptomatic gallstones typically manifest with right upper quadrant abdominal pain, often accompanied by nausea and vomiting.

The pain is often severe, may abate over several hours (biliary colic), or may progress to cholecystitis, with persistent pain and fever. On examination, there is pain to palpation in the right upper quadrant (Murphy's sign).

 
 
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